Kake

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Kake is located 100 miles south of Juneau on the northwest coast of Kupreanof Island in the Alexander Archipelago. Nestled in the Tongass National Forest, the community is blessed with breathtaking sceneryThe beautiful beachfront village has been home to the Kake tribe of Tlingit Native Americans for thousands of years. The village has a population of 500 and nearly 70 percent are of Tlingit heritage. The word Kake comes from the Tlingit word “Keix’,” meaning “opening of daylight” and the village features one of the largest totem poles in the world, carved out of a single tree.

Kake is located 100 miles south of Juneau on the northwest coast of Kupreanof Island in the Alexander Archipelago. Nestled in the Tongass National Forest, the community is blessed with breathtaking sceneryThe beautiful beachfront village has been home to the Kake tribe of Tlingit Native Americans for thousands of years. The village has a population of 500 and nearly 70 percent are of Tlingit heritage. The word Kake comes from the Tlingit word “Keix’,” meaning “opening of daylight” and the village features one of the largest totem poles in the world, carved out of a single tree.

What to See and Do

Embark on your own wildlife adventure by hiking through one of the area’s several trails discovering waterfalls, fishing or wandering along a stretch of beach. Eagles, black bear, and whales can all be seen from the shore. Sitka black-tailed deer, Alexander Archipelago wolves, beaver, porcupine, red squirrel, marten, moose, and around 300 species of birds can be found on the island.

Don’t forget to visit the Keku Cannery, the historic salmon-packing cannery that was the economic driver for the village during the early part of the 20th century. A National Historic Landmark, Keku is the best-preserved Alaska salmon cannery in Southeast Alaska, with original worker housing, boardwalks between buildings, and period machinery. The Kake Dog Salmon Festival was first organized to celebrate the one millionth pound of salmon processed at the cannery. Now the festival celebrates area fisherman and past cannery workers, and has become a major community event with over 400 visitors attending the day-long festival annually.

Eating and Drinking

Kake is served by a single grocery store, S.O.S Value Mart. A restaurant is also available at the Waterfront Lodge.

Where to Live

Rentals are about $768 per month for a one-bedroom apartment. Median home value is $105,800.

How to Get Around

Air:

Alaska Seaplanes Service to Kake provides service 3 times daily in summer and 1-2 times daily in winter. Charter service, weather permitting is also available. The Kake community has a runway, so visitors can arrive on a wheeled plane instead of a float.

Road:

Kake is not accessible by road.

Water: 

The Alaska Marine Highway System offers an 8-hour ferry ride between Juneau and Kake a few times a week year-round.